Posts Tagged ‘medical’

Resume Tips for Healthcare Professionals

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015

Healthcare has undergone significant changes in the past 20 years, and healthcare organizations are increasingly sensitive to cost control and productivity. Funding sources for both public and private healthcare organizations have cut back reimbursement and allowable expenses. Your healthcare resume must reflect an understanding of these changes. It must show evidence of healthcare skills, experience and a commitment to quality, as well as an ability to evaluate yourself, your peers and your department. There are different ways to reflect your key selling points in your healthcare resume. What is important is creating the right document, written in the right way to get you in that interview room.

Which Resume Format Is Right for You?

Resume: A resume is preferred for healthcare professionals seeking positions in administrative or back-office operations. When seeking a management position, reverse-chronological resumes are preferred, as your experience and skills can be evaluated vis-a-vis the organization’s own needs. Hospitals and healthcare agencies need qualified people in accounting, purchasing, plant operations and MIS; these departments are usually open to qualified applicants from fields other than healthcare.

Curriculum Vitae (“Course of One’s Life”): CVs are used primarily by people in medical, academic and scientific professions. CVs should have a tone of understated modesty. The professional should list all credentials but not necessarily boast (as in a resume) about the achievements. Typical headings include education/degrees, internships, professional experience, awards and honors, publications (books, articles, reports, journals), speaking engagements, conferences and professional affiliations. The length depends on the level of experience — a CV for a new grad might be one page, whereas someone at the top of his profession might have multiple pages.

Getting Job Interviews

When describing your work history and accomplishments, use an abundance of buzzwords to get noticed:

  • Caseload: If you wish to stay in a similar healthcare field, elaborate on the type of caseload you’ve managed, including the number of patients/clients served and the specific challenges your caseload presented.

  • Computer/Tech Skills: Include software and program expertise, especially if it is related to healthcare. Your technical skills can be listed in a separate Technical Summary section or within the context of another achievement. For example, “developed and implemented patient status/tracking system using MS Access.”

  • Continuous Quality Initiatives (CQI): Quality improvement initiatives that highlight an understanding of systems and process analysis, problem identification and qualitative oversight. Keep in mind that generic QI oversight is a normal and expected component of any healthcare professional’s background.

  • Grant Writing/Fundraising: Money talks, and if you know the language well enough to develop new funding streams, recruiters notice.

  • Operating Revenue: Whether you are a clinician, line staffer or administrator, the size of your budget influences the prestige and significance of your past work experiences. Be aware that an organization’s budgets are often available in the public record and can be verified.

  • Program/Service Development and Expansion: In today’s healthcare environment, you expand services, or you don’t succeed. Speak to costs, revenue, patients served and other quantifiable information on your healthcare resume.

  • Research/Publications: Are you keeping up on your industry’s cutting edge? Healthcare employers are normally impressed by a distinguished list of publications. Avoid obscure or unrelated publishing credits.

  • Regulatory/Government Agencies: Include expertise in regulatory compliance and successes with city, state and federal agencies and programs, such as HCFA, JCAHO, Medicare and Medicaid.

  • Training: Confident public speaking and presence count. Have you developed and/or implemented a training curriculum on subject matter in your profession?

  • Transdisciplinary/Interdisciplinary Teams: No man (or woman) is an island. Note your ability to work with different groups of professionals. Ideally, indicate a successful outcome that resulted from collaboration with others.

Origin from Monster

Creating an Impressive CV

Thursday, March 21st, 2013

The curriculum vitae is a professional document designed to present the entire scope and content of a professional’s career. This format is mostly used in medical or academic professions (and also overseas) so as to highlight research projects, journals, citations, etc. The format of a CV is similar to a professional resume; however, the CV is often much longer, being far more comprehensive, and generally includes details that a resume would not.

The CV allows for a more free flowing format and style than a standard resume, and each profession or field has variations on what’s included. There are certain standard features, however, that a CV should have, and certain strategies you should use to artfully present your information, including:

• Highlight the most relevant and sought after qualifications, skills, projects, and research right at the beginning, in order to grab the attention of recruiters and hiring managers.

• An educational summary in reverse chronological order is recommended. For fresh or junior applicants, it is important to mention academic grades, internship credentials, awards, and dissertation summaries. For experienced and mid-career professionals, it is more important to mention citations and academic and research papers written or quoted, with clear mention of the journal or university to ensure the credibility of the claim and to augment the achievement.

• Brief summaries of the challenges and outcomes of important projects and research assignments is also important. The placement of these summaries should not disrupt the overall flow of the document.

• Unlike a resume, it is common to mention recommendations and references directly on a CV, alongside awards and medals. Make sure these are relevant to the position and don’t be afraid to name drop if you have recommendations from important people in the field.

• Avoid the temptation to overuse academic jargon unless it is relevant and helpful for explaining your credentials.

• A neat and crisp presentation is essential. It is not considered professional to add lots of colors, unusual fonts, or graphics to the document. Be judicious with your use of bullet points: while they are helpful for organizing content, too many will break up the flow of the text and make the document appear much longer than it actually is.

• While there is no defined length for a CV, and details are essential, do not allow the document to become too long. A very long CV does not reflect clarity of thought and busy hiring managers may only have a minute or two to read it. It is therefore important to highlight and emphasize the skills and background that clearly illustrate why you are the best candidate for the role.

• As this document represents the overall scope of your career, and is likely the first thing an organization will see, it is important that it contain honest, consistent, and accurate information. Make sure to spell check the document to ensure that no inadvertent errors have slipped in and be sure to avoid the temptation to expand or inflate your achievements.