Posts Tagged ‘job boards’

Avoid Giving Away Your Job Search

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

If you’re looking for a job outside your current employer, it’s often helpful to avoid giving away your job search. That’s because if you’re discovered, it can sour your relationship with your boss, which can be detrimental if you change your mind about obtaining another job. And, there are some managers (hopefully rare) who may even take the drastic step of ending your employment.

Hiding your job search can be difficult in this era of social media use, so always think before you act when it comes to posting anything online or discussing your activity with others (especially co-workers).

Here are tips to avoid giving away your job search:

Keep profiles updated. Always keep online profiles up-to-date so you won’t trigger suspicions when you’re actively looking. That way, people think you’re diligent in keeping your information accurate, as opposed to thinking you’re job hunting because you rarely make any updates and then suddenly make changes.

Lie low electronically. Unless you currently don’t have a job or are working for yourself, avoid social media posts telling others that you’re looking for a new job. This sounds obvious, but you’d be surprised how many people actively discuss their job hunt in social media forums – and then can’t figure out how their employer found out.

Be careful what you display online. If you join groups for job hunting online, make sure they’re hidden from view in your profile. For example, on LinkedIn you can change your Group settings so certain groups aren’t visible on your public profile.

Don’t wallpaper the world with your resume. Contrary to what many people think, uploading your resume to every possible job board or job site usually won’t get you the job you desire. Even worse, it could get you unwanted publicity with the wrong people seeing it, such as you current company’s HR recruiters or your boss. Instead, take the time to conduct research and target your resume to only those few key jobs you really want.

Conduct your job search from home, not work. Never use company equipment, such as a company computer or mobile phone, in in your job search because these leave electronic footprints that can be traced if the company chooses to do so. Further, co-workers can easily overhear your telephone conversations in a cubicle environment and sometimes even see your computer screen.

Conduct job hunting on your own time. Never conduct your job search on company time, because that’s the same as stealing from the company (you’re stealing work time). Take a personal day or vacation day for job search work (or use your lunch time and home computer), telephone interviews, and in-person interviews.

Choose appropriate times for telephone interviews. Preferably, schedule telephone interviews before work, during lunch, or after work. Even better, schedule them for your day off. Most hiring managers understand that if they’re interviewing someone already employed, then they’ll need to work around the person’s schedule. Further, most savvy hiring managers look for potential employees who specifically state that their telephone interview needs to be scheduled at a time that won’t conflict with their existing job, so they won’t break any company policies.

Schedule in-person interviews during time off of work. Take advantage of your days off, paid time off, or vacation days when you need to attend in-person interviews. Avoid using sick days for interviewing – Murphy’s Law will usually will kick in and you’ll inevitably see someone from work who knows you’re supposed to be at home sick.

Shhh. Not everyone at work is your friend and can keep information confidential – so be careful whom you tell. “Lindsey” (name changed) once confidentially shared with a co-worker that she was looking for another job. She thought this person was her friend. The next day Lindsey’s boss confronted her about her job search. It turns out the co-worker was the person who shared the confidential information with others within the company and had purposely spread rumors so she could get Lindsey in trouble with their manager.

If, however, you’re looking for a new job within your current employer, it will be difficult to keep your job search quiet. That’s because most companies require that your manager be notified when you apply for a position in a different department. This is to ensure managers work together and that no workload or productivity issues are created when an employee moves into a different job. It also helps prevent problem employees from hopping from one department to another. Even if your job search is internal, it’s still best to go about your job search quietly, with professionalism, and by following the tips above.

Original from Forbes

Ten Job Search Rules To Break

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

We’re not advised to tell the truth when we’re job-hunting — just the opposite. We’re coached to contort ourselves into pretzel shapes, to be whoever we think the employer wants us to be. We’re encouraged to play a role on a job search, to fawn and grovel and hope the hiring manager falls in love with us. What horrible advice! If you wanted to go into the theatre, you’d be in Hollywood by now.

We say that if people don’t get you, they don’t deserve you. Better to let them see who you really are at the earliest opportunity, right? Job-seekers are often surprised that more honesty doesn’t hurt them on a job search. If the people they’re interviewing with have any self-esteem and confidence at all, your human honesty helps you.

And if managers are so fearful that they can’t handle a dose of honesty, do you really want to work for them?

Here are ten traditional job search rules to start breaking on your job search.

Ten Job Search Rules to Break

1. Follow the defined process.

The defined recruiting process is broken. Black Holes are great in space, and horrible on a job search. Many job-seekers have trouble stepping out of the Good Little Rule-Following Job Seeker persona. If they can do that, they’ll be unstoppable!

We’ve been trained since childhood to do what we’re told to do. The Black Hole will eat your resume and shred its atoms, but people keep pitching resumes into gaping recruiting portals anyway. Don’t do it! Reach your hiring manager directly.

2. If you know someone in the company, give that person your resume and tell them to give it to the hiring manager.

A job search, like any marketing campaign, makes use of channels. Your friend inside the company might be a tremendous channel for your job search, or a horrible one. The question is “How well does your friend know the hiring manager?” If your friend does know him or her, you’re in great shape. Otherwise, your friend carrying your resume in the door is just a side entrance to the same Black Hole you were trying to avoid.

Choose the strongest channel for your job search: an intermediary friend, the direct approach, or a third-party recruiter. Don’t assume that your in-house friend is your best job-search conduit.

3. Use a traditional zombie-style resume and cover letter.

You’re not a zombie. You’re a human, switched-on and ready for action, so don’t brand yourself using zombie language like “Results-oriented professional with a bottom line orientation!” (Ropwablo for short.)

You can write a resume that sounds like you, and you’ll make a stronger impression if you do. Forget the old-fashioned cover letter and write a compelling letter instead.

4. In your overture to employers, emphasize the way your background matches the job spec.

You know that a written job spec has as much in common with the actual job as I have in common with Genghis Khan. Forget the tedious and delusional job-spec bullets and focus on the pain behind the job ad.

5. Spend most of your energy applying for posted jobs, and do so online.

If you want to destroy your mojo in the first two weeks of your job search, spend all your time online hunting for positions to apply to. Then, toss resumes into Black Holes and pretend that someone is going to get back to you. You’d be better off putting a stack of paper resumes on the passenger seat in your car and driving down the freeway with the window open. In that case, one of your resumes might land on a hiring manager’s desk by chance.

If you want a job rather than a boring daytime activity, step away from the Black Hole and take a more active role in your job search.

Split your job-search time three ways into three equal parts: one-third of your available time and energy will go to responding to posted job ads, one-third of it will be spent reaching out to target employers whether or not they have jobs posted, and the final one-third of your time and energy will go to networking.

6. Use your networking time and energy letting people know about your job search, your specific skills and how each friend can help you.

Your job-search networking is not a hunt for jobs to apply to. It’s a mojo-building, introduction-generating exercise instead. Use your networking to coach your friends on the issues they’re dealing with (nothing grows mojo better than coaching someone else) and to get their moral support in return.

When people get unadvertised jobs through networking – and people do that every day – it’s because they focused on the relationship, not the transaction.

7. If you’re asked to report your salary history, share every detail going back as far as the employer asks you to.

Are you ready to go work for people who don’t trust you? If the employer asks you to verify every salary you’ve ever earned, the relationship is not off to an auspicious start. Keep your salary history to yourself.

8. When the employer asks you to jump, do it.

No employer is ever going to love you more than they do just before they make you a job offer. Don’t be a doormat on your job search. A new job is essentially an extended consulting gig, so manage the process the same way you would if you were proposing a consulting assignment to a new client. Don’t climb over every pile of broken glass they put in front of you. If you show up as the most compliant, docile candidate in the bunch, don’t expect to be able to argue for your strategic value later in the process.

9. Don’t bring up the topic of salary – let the employer bring it up.

It is suspicious to me that the awful, conventional wisdom “Don’t mention salary – let the employer bring it up first. Whoever speaks first, loses” fits so nicely with many job-seekers’ natural aversion to broaching sticky topics like money.

That advice is repeated everywhere, and it couldn’t be more mistaken. In a job search, you have to price yourself like a house. You have to let employers know what it will take you get you on board. If you wait for the job offer to finally learn what an organization is planning to pay you, you’re in the world’s worst negotiating position.

After all, it was your obligation to show (not tell) these folks what you’re worth, during the interview process. If you’ve been through two or three interviews with a gang of people and they subsequently decide collectively — maybe delusionally as well, but that’s a different topic — that you are worth $X, then in their eyes you are worth $X, and you’ve already missed your prime opportunity to show them differently.

10. Do whatever you need to do and say whatever you need to say to get the job.

When you agree to play a part to get a job, you’ve made a deal with the devil. As tempted as you may be to bite your lip when you’re frustrated with a hiring process, don’t do it. If you have to take a survival job to pay the bills, take it! Don’t swap your integrity for a paycheck from people who don’t even see, much less value, the real you.

Remember that only the people who get you deserve you. The faster you say “No thanks” to the wrong opportunities, the faster the right ones will roll in.

Why Won’t They Hire Me?

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

You’ve applied for every job out there, and no one is getting back to you. Why? Who cursed you with this jobless existence?

It may actually be you. Yes, for all your activities, your strategies, and your button clicking, at the heart of it all, you might be the cause of your own job search fail. How can you be sure? I’ve compiled a list of the most common mistakes people make when applying for a job. Make sure you’re not falling for one of these classic job search blunders:

1: Typos!

The number one biggest mistake people make (and one of the easiest to avoid) when applying for jobs is having typos on their resumé. No matter what the job is, no one wants to hire someone who doesn’t even use spell check. Or even worse, if you’ve made a grammatical error that leads to a humorous misunderstanding (example: occupation – internet booger instead of blogger); that’s just awful. It’s not the end of the world, of course, if you spell your own name wrong on your C.V. It is if you then send it out to everyone, however. Just spend two or three minutes proofreading what you’ve written. If you’re unsure, get a friend to look at it for you or leave it to the professionals.

2: Not having an online presence or having a bad one.

If you’re applying for high-end jobs, potential employers are going to want to know as much about you as possible. If they make a quick search on Google and they can’t find you, it won’t look good. They want to see for themselves the work you have done in the past and what you’re capable of. Some ideas for getting your online presence rolling: set up a LinkedIn account and create profiles on freelance and industry websites.

On the other hand, if your potential employer looks you up and finds a picture of you hitting a bong, it’s going to be even worse than having no presence at all. By all means, post your social life online, but make sure it’s private. It should be just for your close friends. Facebook allows you to view your profile as a member of the public would see it. You should definitely try this out, so you can see what potential employers see and make sure you’re not revealing more about yourself to them than you might want.

3: Using an informal email address.

No matter the situation, you should always have a professional email address for use on your resumé. If you were hiring, would you pick “John.Doe” or “iLikeCars93” or “fluffybunnies”? Choose something with your name in it and if you need to include numbers, select the year of your birth or graduation from college (i.e., george.hamilton1990@gmail.com).

4: Not following instructions.

When you’re reading so many job descriptions because you’re busy applying for everything on the internet, you probably don’t read each of them thoroughly; you’re likely just skimming before applying. However, you should always read each description all the way to the end. Often there will be instructions included, sometimes just to check to be sure you’ve actually read it! Employers won’t want to hire someone for a job who can’t even follow the simple instructions to apply for it.

5: Focusing solely on jobs posted online.

It’s incredibly convenient having all those jobs available there on one page (whether Monster or CareerBuilder or one of the aggregate search engines like Indeed), saving you the effort of wandering from place to place just to be rejected. However, it isn’t perfect. There are plenty of places hiring that don’t put their jobs up on the internet: some prefer face-to-face interviews straight away; some just don’t want the hassle of receiving and sorting through thousands of random responses like yours. You might be missing some great opportunities if you stick only to the online job boards. Branch out: seek referrals from people already working at a company or reach out to hiring managers directly at places that don’t seem to be hiring… you may be surprised by the roles on offer.

6: Failing to ask questions in an interview.

We’ve all been there: they ask if you have any questions at the end of the interview and you have no idea what to say. Or you just don’t want to make a fool of yourself by asking a stupid question. So you wing it: “no, I don’t have any questions”. The problem here is that you seem uninterested and uninformed. You want your future employer to be interested in you, and yet you don’t seem to be interested enough in the job or the company to ask questions about them! Have a few good questions prepared in advance about the role, the company, etc. so they know you’ve been doing your homework.

Job Search Tips from a Recruiter’s Perspective

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

Searching for a new job can be exciting or filled with anxiety, depending on when you enter the market. If you are exploring your options while you’re still employed, then the process might be enjoyable, as you look to map out your career from behind the safety of a monthly paycheck. But when you’re unemployed for whatever reason and need to find a job immediately to pay the rent, it can be a very trying time. No matter what the circumstances are, it can be helpful to turn for advice to the people who are basically always on a job search, if only for other people: recruiters. Here are a few valuable tips from the world of recruiting to help simplify your job search and increase your chances for success:

  • Job boards are not obsolete; they are just changing with the times. If they were dead, then no new jobs would be showing up on them each day (and hundreds, if not thousands, of them clearly are). These boards and their databases still serve as a central repository for job opportunities and a talent pool for potential hiring mangers. Do not avoid them; use them wisely.
  • Only apply for a job when your skills, background, and experience are a good fit. The Application Tracking Software (ATS) employed by most companies will filter out your resume immediately if it is not carefully worded and in line with the job description. Understanding how the various ATS applications work is an important part of the job search and realizing that you are not only dealing with human beings but also “robots” will help you to determine what roles to apply for and how to frame your resume for a particular role in order to pass through the automated filter into the hands of the decision makers.
  • Don’t just sit back idly and wait for a response after you’ve submitted your resume. Allow for some time to pass (at most a week) and then follow up with the recruiter or the company. Be polite but persistent until they inform you of a decision.
  • Most recruiters will not reply back to you with a negative response, only communicating if the response is positive. But to be sure, wait for a week and follow up via email or phone (as sometimes there are delays in the process on the client side). If the recruiter indicates the hiring manager is not interested in moving forward, but you still think you are a good fit, you may also apply online at the prospective employer’s web site (where available) or job board posting.
  • Most companies also invite referrals from existing employees. It is therefore very important to stay connected and network within the industry in order to be positioned for a referral should a new role open up.
  • You should not shy away from seeking referrals (many companies prefer to hire this way). A referral is a very potent tool and social media tools like LinkedIn and Facebook are a good way to stay connected, seek recommendations on your past work, and generate an online brand that will keep you at the forefront of your network’s collective mind for potential referrals. In other words, you want the people in your network to think of you first when a new role opens up so that they are ready to pass you along immediately.

In summary, applying through job boards, no matter what you may hear, is not useless. However, keep in mind that most recruiters do not rely solely on job boards to find candidates. They now look for talented passive candidates via other means, including LinkedIn and various other online and offline networking portals. So don’t just depend on the job board; move and mingle in the industry and sooner or later the right job will be yours!